Genealogy Data Page 2 (Notes Pages)

For privacy reasons, Date of Birth and Date of Marriage for persons believed to still be living are not shown.

Shrope, John A. (b. 28 DEC 1785, d. 28 APR 1859)

Note: John A. Shrope was a Blacksmith These records verified by: 1.
The History of Hunterdon and Somerset Counties By James P.
Snell, pages 508 and 509. 2. Marriage Records of Hunterdon
County, New Jersey By Deats, pages 255 and 269. 3 The 1860
Federal census for Hunterdon County, New Jersey page 52. From
1830 until 1833 John A. Shrope served on the Town Committee for
the township of Bethlehem. From 1853 until 1858 he was a
surveyor of highways for Union Township, and from 1857 until
1858 he served as overseer of roads and appropriations. He
owned two tracts of land, #6A in Union Township and tract #9A
in Bethlehem Township. In 1835 Ferdinand Shrope, uncle of John
A. died and John A. bought the 106 acre farm in Bethlehem
Township that had been the home of Ferdinand and his wife,
Dorothea for $1,821.75. Note that this property is directly
across the street from the property of Amos Smith who was
probably a relative of John A.'s wife, Elnor Charity (Smith)
Shrope. Also across the street from this farm was the property
of Aaron Van Syckel, a close friend of the Shrope family.
Settlement of his estate is recorded on page #471 and 477 of
book #1 in the County Clerk's office at Flemington, New Jersey
- Dated 08 May, 1862. Buried in the Bethlehem Baptist
Churchyard at Pattenburg, New Jersey INVENTORY #5946J FOR JOHN
A. SHROPE WHO DIED ON 28 APRIL, 1859 A true and perfect
inventory and appraisement of the personal property of John A.
Shrope, deceased late of the County of Hunterdon, State of New
Jersey, made this 6th day of May, A. D. one thousand eight
hundred and fifty nine by Christopher Shrope, (son) and John
Blane Administrators and Lewis Humphrey and George Gano
designated freeholders. In the parlor side board, $5.00, table
and cover $2.00 $ 7.00 6 cane seated chairs $5.00, stand and
books $3.00, clock $5.00. 13.00 Carpet $10.50, chair, pictures,
blinds and mantel ornaments $2.00 12.50 In the family room, one
bureau $3.00, 6 chairs $1.50 corner cupboard $3.00 7.50
Contents of corner cupboard $5.00, silver spoons $2.00 7.00
Stove $2.00, stand, table, carpet $2.00 glass and remainder of
contents of room $1.00 5.50 One note against Henry S. Shrope $
50.00 Interest $ 3.30 53.00 ' ' ' Wm. B. Shrope $
50.00 ' $ 6.30 56.30 ' ' ' Henry S. Shrope
$100.00 ' $ 6.60 106.60 ' ' ' Wm. B. Shrope
$150.00 ' $ 48.29 198.29 ' ' ' Peter B.
Shrope $ 50.00 ' $ .30 50.30 ' ' ' John C.
Weene $800.00 ' $ 4.80 804.80 One bond against Lewis
Heath $200.00 ' $ 1.20 201.20 One truck wagon,
harness and horse 60.00 One carriage wagon $50.00, one spring
wagon $5.00 55.00 Cutting box, bag of oats, and remaining
contents of barn $3.50. 3.50 In the stable, bridle collar, old
harness and fly nets .75 In hovel, shafts, tongue, sleigh,
trough, plow hoes 3.00 ten fowls $1.50, ladders 37€c, chains
62€c, cow $25.00 27.50 two hogs $12.00, harrow 50c, ladder
sides, chains and implements $2.00 14.50 Stove and fixtures
$3.00, contents of spring house $3.00 6.00 In the kitchen,
chairs 62€c, cupboard and contents $2.00 table and remainder in
room 50c 3.12€ Dresser and contents, server, shimmer & tunnel
$2.00 contents of pantry 3.50 In the leanto room, bed and
bedding $4.00, blanket 50c comforter 50c 5.00 Wearing apparel
$4.50, barrel & vinegar $2.00 6.50 Remaining contents of said
room, flour & bag $3.00 3.00 $1714.66€ (con't.) INVENTORY FOR
JOHN A. SHROPE (Con't.) Amount brought forward: $1714.66€ On
the porch, tools 50c, meat cash 50c Axes, hoes and shovels 25c
1.25 Contents of the cellar $3.00, contents of garret 25c 3.25
In pink room upstairs, bed and bedding $6.00, do with curtains
$15.00 21.00 Trundle bedstead, bed and bedding $4.00, chairs
carpet, commode and glass $1.50 5.50 In 2nd room, bed and
bedding $10.00, carpet and window drapes $2.00 12.00 3
blankets, 1 comforter, 3 quilts, and 1 spread $8.00 8.00
sub-total $1765.66€ Green grain growing 11.00 Total $1776.66€
Witness our hands this 6th of May, 1859 Signed: Christopher
Shrope (son) John Blane
Administrators Lewis Hamphrey George Gano
Appraisers
Event: Place: Blacksmith, Norton, (Pattenburg), NJ.
Death: 28 APR 1859 Norton, New Jersey
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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Smith, Eleanor Charity (b. 31 DEC 1788, d. 16 OCT 1867)
Note: Buried in the Bethlehem Baptist Churchyard at Pattenberg, New
Jersey
Event: Date: 1809
Place: married, By Justice of the Peace, Benjamin Egbert
Note: Type: Fact 1
Death: 16 OCT 1867 NJ
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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Shrope, Christopher (b. 02 NOV 1761, d. 21 SEP 1848)
Note: Benjamin Egbert, a Judge of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas
in and for the County of Hunterdon. Christopher Srope, a
resident of the Township of Bethlehem, aged 75 years or
thereabouts, who being first duly sworn according to Law, makes
the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the
Act of Congress passed June 7, 1832. That he entered the
service of the United States under the following named officers
and served herein states that at the beginning of the
Revolutionary War, he turned out in the Militia under Captain
Samuel Growendyke in the Township of Bethlehem, from there to
within sight of the Brickhouse near Elizabethtown, turned and
went to Spanktown where they remained for two or three days
then went to Amboy and then on to Hatteniland. I think this was
in the Spring of 1775. This tour was for one month. On the
next tour he marched to Elizabethtown. He was at Elizabethtown
on three tours of one month each under Cap'ts. Gearhart, Samuel
Growendyke and Daniel Brink. They had one small battle with
the British and took several prisoners and wounded some. One
tour with Lieutenant John Farley and Adam Pope, Ensign.
Colonels Frelinghousen and Taylor, and Major Eghart went in
three divisions. It was so long ago, I do not remember the
time nor the year but I do remember that some people were
making cider -- Under Cap't. Albert Opdycke we marched to
Springfield, on a one month tour where we witnessed three spies
hung. My next tour was with General Catt and they marched to
Newark, where we lay until discharged, this tour was for two
weeks. I was called twice but discharged for want of more men.
I was called to Pittstown to guard the Tories and remembered
being in the Wagon service for a long time. I drove a four
horse team in the public service, I was quite young at that
time. I do not remember who drew my pay but I think my father
got the certificates, because he had drawn provisions for the
home and for himself.I was all the time carting for the Army in
Cap,t. John Gardner's Brigade, we went on a tour from Trenton
to Philadelphia, took wood from what was called The Monnon,
Pennsylvania and brought flour back to Trenton. It was in the
winter, being very cold with the river full of ice it took one
whole day to get the entire Brigade across the river Delaware.
We then got orders to take provisions to the Army at
Morristown. Three Brigades started but only three teams
arrived, and there was no feed for our horses. The roads were
so bad that the rest of the teams gave out. We were ordered
back for more provisions but the conditions of the roads made
slow work of it. We went from Trenton to Princeton then to
Millson and from there to Morristown again. This time we came
back through Dutch Valley then on to Pittstown and from there
back to Trenton and so on in this manner from place to place
carting provisions for the Army; I remember loading at
Pittstown and taking it to the Army at Hackettstown, the Court
House at Morristown and a number of places no longer
remembered. I served under Cap,t. Albert Opdycke, Major Call
and I saw General Maxwell. I hereby relinquish every claim
whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declare
my name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.
Signed, Christopher Srope Sworn to before me: Benjamin Egbert
Judge of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas The above
declaration is certified by the following who are well
acquainted with Christopher Srope, believe him to be 75 years
old and is imputed and believed in the neighborhood to have
been a soldier in the revolution. Signer - Holloway Hunt,
Clergyman William Maxwell Benjamin Egbert, Judge NOTE: His
request was disallowed but later in 1851 his wife, Thankful was
granted a pension of $40.00 per year until her death in 1852.
Hunterdon County, Will #5168J for: Written 28
August, 1837 New Jersey Christopher Srope
Probated 13 February, 1849 I, Christopher Srope of the Township
of Bethlehem of the county of Hunterdon and the state of New
Jersey being weak in body, but of sound mind, memory and
understanding, do make and publish this writing to be my last
Will and Testament in manner and form as follows: viz: First I
do hereby order that my executors do, as soon as can be done,
pay all my just debts and funeral expenses. Secondly My will is
and I do hereby direct that my executors make sale of all my
property both Real and Personal as soon as can be done to best
advantage, and convert the same into cash or on Securities
drawing interest and I do hereby empower my executors to make
and execute a good secure title to the purchase such as I could
have made if living and signed the same. Thirdly My will is and
I do hereby give and bequeath to my dear wife, Thankful Srope,
and my son, Ferdinand Srope during their natural lives or the
life of either of them, all the proceeds of my estate (after
the paying of debts, funeral expenses and setting up the
estate) that is if the interest thereof be insufficient then I
direct that so much of the principal be taken as will be
necessary to support them decently the same to be paid for them
as fast as necessity requires it, and after the death of my
said wife and my son, Ferdinand then I do hereby give and
bequeath the residue of my estate to all my children, viz: John
Shrope, David P. Shrope, Catharine Hough, Sarah Mc Claughan,
Mary Bilby, Rebecca Roberts, Joseph P. Shrope, Isaac R. Srope,
and Samuel P. Shrope, (or in case of their, or either of their
death, then to the legal heirs of such as have died) share and
share alike. Whereas I have had sundry dealing with all my
children for which I have made no charge against any of them,
and I do consider that I have over paid each for any claim they
may have against me or my estate. Now my will is that all
claims (except Bonds or Notes) against either of them be
cancelled and if any of my children present for allowance
(except Bonds or Notes) and claim against my estate then my
will is that such child be forever barred from receiving any of
the residue of my estate as before stated. I do hereby nominate
and appoint my sons, John Shrope, David P. Shrope and Isaac R.
Srope to be trustees for my wife, Thankful and my son,
Ferdinand provided they give the requisite security to the
Surrogate General for the faithful performance of their trust,
and if any should decline or refuse to give the requisite
Security then to such of them as will give Security. In witness
where of I have hereunto set my hand and seal the twenty eighth
day of August in the year of our Lord one thousand eight
hundred and thirty seven. Signed, Sealed, Published, Pronounced
and Declared, by the said Christopher Signed, Srope
to be his Last Will and Testament in the presence of us --
Abraham Lunger Christopher
Srope Aaron Starker Emeline Starker INVENTORY OF CHRISTOPHER
SROPE Filed 19 March, 1849 Inventory and appraisal of the
goods, chattel, rights and credits late of Christopher Srope,
deceased. Apparel $ 20.00
Household and kitchen furniture 79.25 Farming utensils
12.20 Two cows 50.00 One
horse 35.00 Notes of hand
against sundry persons 301.50 Balance
1.50 $499.45 Inventory of all and singular the goods, chattels
and credits of the said deceased that have or shall come to
their knowledge or possession, or to the possession of any
other person or persons for their use, and render a just and
true account thereof, when thereunto lawfully required.
Published and sworn before me 13 February, 1849 George C.
Leymann Surrogate Signed: Kingwood Township
18 July, 1851 Hunterdon County State of New Jersey On this
eighteenth day of July, 1851 personally appeared before me,
Samuel H. Britton, one of the Justices of the peace in and for
the County aforesaid. Thankful Srope, she being well known to
me as the reputed widow of Christopher Srope, deceased, who was
in his life time a resident of Beth-lehem township in the
County aforesaid. The said Thankful being now a resident of
Kingwood township and she being first duly sworn according to
law doth on her oath declare, (in order to obtain the benefit
of the provision made by the act of Congress passed on 7 July,
1838 entitled 'An act granting half pay and pensions to certain
widows') that she is the widow of Chris- topher Srope, who was
a teamster in the war of the Revolution. She further declares
that she was married to her late husband the said Christopher
Srope, on the 24th day of April, 1785, and that her husband,
the said Christopher Srope died on the 21 day of September,
1848 and that she was not married to him prior to his leaving
the service, but the marriage took place previous to the first
of January, 1794, viz: at the time above stated. That some time
prior to the death of her husband he had filed an application
for a pension under the Act of 7 June, 1832 from the County
aforesaid but the application was disallowed. That she has not
married since the death of the said Chris-topher Srope, but
remains his widow. Now the object of this declaration is to ask
in right of her late husband a re-examination of the evidence
filed by him, and also to ask for a pension in her own right
under the Act of 7 July, 1838. Sworn and sub- scribed on this
day and year above written before me. Signed, Samuel H. Britton
Justice of the Peace Signed, Thankful ( X ) Srope (her mark)
NOTE: Thankful Srope was granted a pension of $40.00 per year
until her death in 1852. State of New Jersey 30
July, 1852 County of Hunterdon I, William Emery, Clerk of the
Court of Common Pleas held at Flemington in and for the County
and State afoursaid, do hereby certify that satisfact-ory
evidence has been exhibited to said court that Christopher
Srope, who during his lifetime was an applicant for a
Revolutionary Pension, and was a resident of said County, died
on the 21st day of September, 1848 leaving a widow, Thankful
Srope, who died on the 19th day of June, 1852, and that the
following named are the only children that survived the said
Christopher and Thankful Srope as follows: John Shrope, David
P. Srope, Sarah Srope, intermarried with James Mc Cloughan,
Mary Srope, intermarried with William Bilby, Rebecca Srope,
intermarried with Mordecai Roberts, Ferdinand Srope, Isaac R.
Srope and Samuel P. Shrope. In Testimony whereof I have
Hereunto set my Hand and affixed the Seal of said Court, at
Flemington, this 30th day of July, A. D., 1852 Signed, William
Emery, Clerk
Event: Place: Private, Hunterdon Cty. Militia, Revolutionary War, 'Srope'
Note: Type: Fact 2
Event: Place: Farmer, Bethlehem Tnshp, Hunterdon Cty., NJ.
Death: 21 SEP 1848 Union Tnshp, Hunterdon Cty, New Jersey
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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Penwell, Thankful (b. 07 MAR 1764, d. 19 JUN 1852)
Note: Buried in the Bethlehem Presbyterian Churchyard at Grandin, New
Jersey In the old cemetery.
Death: 19 JUN 1852 Baptistown, New Jersey
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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Schropp, Johann Christoph (b. 18 FEB 1726/27, d. 27 JUL 1806)
Note: A LITTLE PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY, by Irene Shrope and Peter Shrope
The first settlers were Dutch (Netherlands) who came up the
Delaware Bay, and settled on the shores of the Delaware River
in 1623, and held control for fifteen years until 1638. The
Dutch occupied this land through rights acquired in
Pennsylvania and New York by the discoveries of Henry Hudson,
an Englishman in the employ of the Dutch East India Company.
New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware together
comprised the New Netherlands. Then came the Swedes who wrested
control from the Dutch and held the territory along the
Delaware River until 1655. They were always at war with the
Dutch, and in 1655 the Dutch reconquered the Swedes, regaining
control of the land for another nine years until 1664. This
time they lost control to the English under Duke of York who
held it until the arrival of the ship 'Welcome' with William
Penn and the Quakers in 1682. The first German Pietists settled
in Germantown, Lancaster, Bethlehem and Nazareth in 1663. Some
years later, poorer people of the German Reformed and Lutheran
groups immigrated from the Rhine valley. They were too poor to
pay for their passage, so they agreed to work for from 4 to 7
years in the New World in voluntary servitude to pay off depts
of passage. After this they were given 50 acres of farm land
with tools to work their new property. They settled in the
fertile valleys and established rich farms which prospered in
succeeding generations. Welch Quakers came in large numbers
before 1700. German immigration came with the Mennonite,
Francis D. Pastorius, who came with some Dutch Quakers in 1683,
founding Germantown, now a part of Philadelphia. The
'Pennsylvania Dutch', as they came to be known, settled in the
counties of Northampton, Berks and Lancaster. These people are
German, not Hollanders. From the beginning, the Germans in
America existed as a people apart. They spoke a different
language, which did not popularize them with the English and
Scotch-Irish people of the New World. Also, their steadfast
adherence to the religions and customs of the old world caused
further estrangement in their relations with the English
speaking peoples. Moreover, they showed little interest in the
social or political affairs of the colony and concentrated
their energies almost wholly on the development of the finest
farming regions of America. The high mark of the German
immigration to America came around 1749 to 1754. At that time
5,000 Germans arrived in this country each year. For the most
part they maintained the same lifestyle as at home.
Energetically, and industriously they cultivated their farms,
advanced their domestic arts, and pursued their religious
beliefs in peace and prosperity. Notes from Irene's original
manuscript: unedited: Buried in St. Jacobs Lutheran Churchyard
At Pinegrove, Pennsylvania This Johann Christoph Schrčopp, Sr.
is the same person as the one with the European ident number
EC00120. He was in the 3rd generation of the European records
but was the first to come to America. By giving him a new
ident number when he came to America the computer will include
him in both the European records and the American records.
Those with the AB code spent most of their lives in New Jersey
and spelled their name Shrope. Those with the BB code spent
most of their lives in Pennsylvania and spelled their name
Schropp. A Catherine Shrope of Alexandria township, Hunterdon
County, New Jersey married John Hoff of Berks County,
Pennsylvania on 10 February, 1816 by Justice of the Peace,
David Everett. (From: Hunterdon County Marriage Records - 1795
to 1875 by Hiram Deats). Could Catharine Henrica remarried
after the death of Christoph? Perhaps that is why we cannot
locate he burial place. Christofel Schrope (1727) and his
grandson, Henry (1803), a blacksmith were present at the
election of Frederick W. Conrad as Lutheran pastor. JOHANN
CHRISTOPHER SCHRčOPP, SR. 1727 to 1806 Johann Christopher
Schrčopp, Sr. was born on 18 February, 1727 in the village of
Oberčowisheim, Germany in the state of Baden where his father,
Hans Jerg Schrčopp, Sr. (1685) and his father before him,
Andreas had lived. All three generations of this family had
attended the Lutheran Church where on 18 June, 1749 Johann
Christopher Schrčopp married Catharina Henrica Scheib- lein.
The records of his birth and marriage can be found in the
Parish Register of the old Lutheran Church in Oberčowisheim.
(Now on micro-film) Christopher was 22 years old when he
married. In late summer of 1751 Christopher and his bride
boarded the ship 'Neptune'. John Mason from Rotterdam was the
Commander. They were on their way to a new life in America!
Their final European stop was at Cowes, England on the Isle of
Wight. The ship arrived at the port of Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania on Tuesday, 24 September, 1751. All passengers
were taken to the court house to take their oath of allegiance
and the usual qualifications and subscribe them. Their
certificates were signed by William Peters, Esq.. He signed
his name 'Christoph Shropp' to the immigration documents. The
record of his arrival is noted in two books, 'Pennsylvania
German Pioneers' by Ralph Beaver Strass-burger and W. J. Hinke,
in Volume I, page 469 and in 'A Collection of Upwards of 30,000
Names of Immigrants in Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776' by
Israel Daniel Rupp, on page 262. There were 284 passengers on
the ship 'Neptune'. Women and children were not included on
the passenger list. Johann Martin Schrob was born on 02 July,
1753 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and was baptized at St.
Michael's Evangelical Lutheran Church on Fifth Street and
Appletree Alley on 08 July, 1753 by Pastor Henry Melchoir
Muhlenburg. Sponsors were John Martin Obersteg and Anna
Cathrina. The congregation of St. Michael's Evangelical
Lutheran Church was the largest of the numerous churches in the
city. It was also the poorest because a large portion of the
members were indentured servants. Very few of it's members
settled as permanent residents of the city; as soon as they had
completed their terms of indenture they usually would move on
to seek secure property for themselves. Between 1754 and 1758
Christopher and his little family moved to Greenwich township
in Phillipsburg, then Sussex County, New Jersey. Here Pastor
Daniel Schumacher baptized the four day old son, Andreas on 19
November, 1758. There can be no doubt that this is the same
family for Schumacher wrote the names of the parents as Johann
Christopher Schrob and Henrica. This record can be found in
the publication of the Pennsylvania German Society (1968)
Volume I, page 249. Christopher, Jr. was born in Phillipsburg
on 02 November, 1761. The next record found for Christopher,
Sr. is on the list of com-municants for St. James Lutheran
'Straw' Church in Greenwich township Phillipsburg on 18 May,
1776. The thatched roof on the log edifice earned it the
nickname of 'Straw' church. Early in it's history it had been
affiliated with St. Michael's of Philadelphia and it's first
pastor, from 1769 to 1773, was Peter Muhlenburg, son of Henry
Melchoir Muhlenberg. In the book 'Revolutionary War Soldier of
New Jersey' by Kenn Stryker- Rodda, Christopher, Sr.,
Ferdinand, Christopher, Jr. and Martin are all listed as
'rateable' from Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Andrew Shrope is
listed in the same company as his brother Christopher, Jr. in
the book 'New Jersey in 1793' by James S. Norton. From the New
Jersey Rateable, Hunterdon County, Bethlehem township for June,
1778 and September, 1780 on page 121 we find Christopher
Shrope, house-holder and Chris. Jr., a single man, 12 acres, 4
horses, 4 horned cattle and 1 hog. In the papers of attorney
John Emley on file at the Hunterdon County Historical Society
at Flemington, New Jersey we find a copy of a seven year land
lease between John Emley and Christopher Shrope with his son
Ferdinand, dated 24 March, 1782 for 146 acres of land. However,
in 1785 Christopher Schropp, Sr. paid a land tax of two
shillings nine pence in Pinegrove township, Schuylkill County,
Pennsylvania. In the Schrope family history by James Monroe
Schrope in the 1932 book of the Hegins Valley Homecoming he
writes: he often heard his Aunt Anna Holdeman tell that three
brothers came over from Europe, sailing from England, during
the Revolutionary War; one settled in New Jersey, one in Berks
County near Reading, and the other, Christoph in Pinegrove
township Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. Subsequent research
has found this tale to be slightly incorrect. As we now know
Christopher arrived in America in 1751, and there are no
records to indicate that any of his brothers came with him.
The three brothers were Christopher's sons, namely,
Christopher, Jr. who settled in New Jersey, Martin who settled
in Berks County near Reading and Andrew who settled in
Pinegrove. They did not come to America during the
Revolutionary War, rather, they came to Pinegrove township in
1785 or 86, near the time of the Revolution, after living in
New Jersey for about 34 years. On 13 May, 1786 Christopher
Shrope, Sr. received a warrant for 200 acres of land in
Pinegrove, Pennsylvania, adjoining the land of Daniel Zerby for
which he paid ą10 gold, silver or United States paper currency
per 100 acres. The warrant was signed by His Excellency,
Benjamin Franklin, President of the Supreme Executive Council
of Pennsylvania. This warrant is recorded in book C, Volume
209, page 133 in the Department of Community Affairs for the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. When the land was re-surveyed on
14 June, 1814 it was found to actually contain 277 acres,
nearly double the land he had held in New Jersey. Since his
lease with John Emley still had three years to run before it
would expire, Ferdinand and Christopher, Jr. remained in New
Jersey as did Martin part of the time. After the Indian raids
Christopher, Sr., with his wife Cathrina, and their son, Andrew
moved across the Blue Mountains to Pinegrove, Pennsylvania some
75 miles west of Phillipsburg, New Jersey. Part of this land
is still occupied by the Schrope descendants today. (1990).
Christopher Shrope, Sr. died on 27 July, 1806 at the age of 79
and is buried in St. Jacobs Lutheran Churchyard at Pinegrove,
Pennsylvania. The name is given as Stoffel in some of the
family records. Stoffel is German for Christopher. OATHS OF
ALLEGIANCE AND ABJURATION On September 14, 1727, Patrick
Gordon, the Lieutenant Governor of the Province of
Pennsylvania, called together the Provincial Council, and
acquainted the board, that he had called them together at this
time to inform Palatines, as 'tis said, and that he has
information they will be very soon followed by a much greater
number, who design to settle in the back parts of this
Province; and as the transport themselves without leave
obtained from the Crown of Great Britain, and settle themselves
upon the Proprietors untaked up lands without any application
to the Proprietor of his Commis-sioners of property, or to the
Government in general, it would be highly necessary to concert
proper measures for the peace and security of the Province,
which may be endangered by such numbers of strangers daily
poured in, who being ignorant of our language and laws, and
settling in a body together, make, as it were, a distinct
people from His Majesties Subjects. The Board taking the same
into their serious consideration, observe, that as these people
pretended at first that they fly hither on the score of their
religious liberties, and come under the protection of His
Majesty, it's requisite that in the first place they should
take the Oath of Allegiance, or some equivalent to it to His
Majesty, and promise fidelity to the Proprietor and obedience
to our establishment Constitution; and therefore, until some
proper remedy can be had from home, to prevent the importation
of such numbers of strangers into this or others of His
Majesties Colonies. 'Tis order, the Masters of the vessels
importing them shall be examined whether they have any leave
granted them by the Court of Britain for the importation of
these foreigners, and that a list shall be taken of the names
of all these people, their several occupations, and the places
from when they come, and shall be further examined touching
their intention in coming hither; and further, that a writing
be drawn up for them to sign declaring their Allegiance and
Subjection to the King of Great Britain and Fidelity to the
Proprietary of the Province, and that they will demean
themselves peaceably towards all of His Majesties Subjects, and
strictly observe, and conform to the laws of England and of
this Government. At a Council held at the Courthouse of
Philadelphia, September 21st, 1727 Present: The Honorable
Patrick Gordon, Esq., Governor. William Fishbourn
James Logan, Richard Hill, Esq.'rs. A
paper being drawn up to be signed by those Palatines, who
should come into the Province with an intention to settle
therein, pursuant to the order of this Board, was this day
presented, read and approved, and is in these words: We
subscribers, natives and late inhabitants of the Palatinate
upon the Rhine and places adjacent, having transported
ourselves and families into the Province of Pensilvania, a
Colony subject to the Crown of Great Britain, in hopes and
expectation of finding retreat and peaceable settlement
therein, do solemnly promise and engage, that we will be
faithful and bear true allegiance to his present MAJESTY KING
GEORGE THE SECOND, and his succes-sors, Kings of Great Britain,
and will be faithful to the Proprietor of this Province; and
that we will demean ourselves peaceably to all His said
Majesties Subjects, and strictly observe and conform to the
laws of England and of this Province, to the utmost of our
power and best of our understand-ing. The above Oath can be
found in The Colonial Records of Pennsylvania, Vol. III, page
282. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* * * THE MUHLENBERGS No history of the German settlers in
that part of Pennsylvania and New Jersey would be complete
without an account of the pioneer missionary Henry Melchoir
Muhlenberg. He was one of the real founders of Lutheranism and
the German Reformed Church in that area. He possessed unusual
organizing ability as well as a very high degree of piety and
learning. He was born 06 September, 1711 in the city of
Einbeck, in the Electoral Principality of Hanover, Germany.
His parents were Nicholaus Melchoir Muhlenberg and Anna Maria
Kleinshmid, daughter of a retired military officer. He went to
school from his seventh to his twelfth year and was confirmed
at twelve years of age. Between age twelve and twenty-one he
learned to play the organ. He also had a fine tenor singing
voice. At twenty-one he resumed his studies especially of
Latin and Greek. He received a free tuition to study at the
university of Gottingen. In May of 1738 he taught primary
school at Halle and later became an instructor in Theology,
Hebrew and Greek. In 1741 he became a missionary to the
Lutheran congregations of Pennsylvania. He landed first on 13
June, 1742 at Charleston, South Carolina. In 1745 Henry
Melchoir Muhlenberg was Pastor of St. Michaels Evangeli-cal
Lutheran Church on the northeast corner of Fifth street and
Appletree Alley in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The church was
built in 1743 and demolished in 1870. The church was replaced
by the Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church on the southeast corner
of Fourth and Cherry streets. This church was built in 1766
and destroyed by fire in 1794. His wife was a daughter of
Conrad Weiser, who was prominent in the early history of New
York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania as an interpreter and agent
in connection with Indian tribes. Dr. Muhlenberg was a man of
very superior education. He had good knowledge of Greek and
Hebrew and spoke English, German, Latin, Holland and Swedish
languages. He received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from
the university of Pennsylvania in 1784. Three of his sons were
sent to Germany to attend a course of theologi-cal training.
Henry Ernst Muhlenberg, D. D. was a skillful botanist as well
as a successful preacher. He preached at New Germantown, New
Jersey and at Raritan churches from 1757 to 1775. John Peter
Muhlenberg was a minister at St. James Lutheran 'Straw' church
in Greenwich from 1769 to 1773. Peter married Anna Barbara
Meyer on 16 November, 1770 and later went to Woodstock,
Virginia. Gotthilf Henrich Ernst Muhlenberg preach at the Old
Stone Church in German Valley. Dr. Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg
died 07 October, 1887. [shrope.ftw] Here we see the first
spelling change of the name from Schropp to various other
forms, including the current, Shrope. Probably due to phonetic
variations from English speaking clerks. Johann Christopher
Schrčopp, Sr. was born on 18 February, 1727 in the village of
Oberčowisheim, Germany in the state of Baden where his father,
Hans Jerg Schrčopp, Sr. (1685) and his father before him,
Andreas had lived. All three generations of this family had
attended the Lutheran Church where on 18 June, 1749 Johann
Christopher Schrčopp married Catharina Henrica Scheib-lein. The
records of his birth and marriage can be found in the Parish
Register of the old Lutheran Church in Oberčowisheim. (Now on
micro-film) Christopher was 22 years old when he married. In
late summer of 1751 Christopher and his bride boarded the ship
'Neptune'. John Mason from Rotterdam was the Commander. They
were on their way to a new life in America! Their final
European stop was at Cowes, England on the Isle of Wight. The
ship arrived at the port of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on
Tuesday, 24 September, 1751. All passengers were taken to the
court house to take their oath of allegiance and the usual
qualifications and subscribe them. Their certificates were
signed by William Peters, Esq.. He signed his name 'Christoph
Shropp' to the immigration documents. The record of his arrival
is noted in two books, 'Pennsylvania German Pioneers' by Ralph
Beaver Strass-burger and W. J. Hinke, in Volume I, page 469 and
in 'A Collection of Upwards of 30,000 Names of Immigrants in
Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776' by Israel Daniel Rupp, on page
262. There were 284 passengers on the ship 'Neptune'. Women and
children were not included on the passenger list. Johann
Martin Schrob was born on 02 July, 1753 in Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania and was baptized at St. Michael's Evangelical
Lutheran Church on Fifth Street and Appletree Alley on 08 July,
1753 by Pastor Henry Melchoir Muhlenburg. Sponsors were John
Martin Obersteg and Anna Cathrina. The congregation of St.
Michael's Evangelical Lutheran Church was the largest of the
numerous churches in the city. It was also the poorest because
a large portion of the members were indentured servants. Very
few of it's members settled as permanent residents of the city;
as soon as they had completed their terms of indenture they
usually would move on to seek secure property for themselves.
Between 1754 and 1758 Christopher and his little family moved
to Greenwich township in Phillipsburg, then Sussex County, New
Jersey. Here Pastor Daniel Schumacher baptized the four day old
son, Andreas on 19 November, 1758. There can be no doubt that
this is the same family for Schumacher wrote the names of the
parents as Johann Christopher Schrob and Henrica. This record
can be found in the publication of the Pennsylvania German
Society (1968) Volume I, page 249. Christopher, Jr. was born in
Phillipsburg on 02 November, 1761. The next record found for
Christopher, Sr. is on the list of com-municants for St. James
Lutheran 'Straw' Church in Greenwich township Phillipsburg on
18 May, 1776. The thatched roof on the log edifice earned it
the nickname of 'Straw' church. Early in it's history it had
been affiliated with St. Michael's of Philadelphia and it's
first pastor, from 1769 to 1773, was Peter Muhlenburg, son of
Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg. In the book 'Revolutionary War
Soldier of New Jersey' by Kenn Stryker- Rodda, Christopher,
Sr., Ferdinand, Christopher, Jr. and Martin are all listed as
'rateable' from Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Andrew Shrope is
listed in the same company as his brother Christopher, Jr. in
the book 'New Jersey in 1793' by James S. Norton. From the New
Jersey Rateable, Hunterdon County, Bethlehem township for June,
1778 and September, 1780 on page 121 we find Christopher
Shrope, house-holder and Chris. Jr., a single man, 12 acres, 4
horses, 4 horned cattle and 1 hog. In the papers of attorney
John Emley on file at the Hunterdon County Historical Society
at Flemington, New Jersey we find a copy of a seven year land
lease between John Emley and Christopher Shrope with his son
Ferdinand, dated 24 March, 1782 for 146 acres of land. However,
in 1785 Christopher Schropp, Sr. paid a land tax of two
shillings nine pence in Pinegrove township, Schuylkill County,
Pennsylvania. In the Schrope family history by James Monroe
Schrope in the 1932 book of the Hegins Valley Homecoming he
writes: he often heard his Aunt Anna Holdeman tell that three
brothers came over from Europe, sailing from England, during
the Revolutionary War; one settled in New Jersey, one in Berks
County near Reading, and the other, Christoph in Pinegrove
township Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. Subsequent research
has found this tale to be slightly incorrect. As we now know
Christopher arrived in America in 1751, and there are no
records to indicate that any of his brothers came with him. The
three brothers were Christopher's sons, namely, Christopher,
Jr. who settled in New Jersey, Martin who settled in Berks
County near Reading and Andrew who settled in Pinegrove. They
did not come to America during the Revolutionary War, rather,
they came to Pinegrove township in 1785 or 86, near the time of
the Revolution, after living in New Jersey for about 34 years.
On 13 May, 1786 Christopher Shrope, Sr. received a warrant for
200 acres of land in Pinegrove, Pennsylvania, adjoining the
land of Daniel Zerby for which he paid ą10 gold, silver or
United States paper currency per 100 acres. The warrant was
signed by His Excellency, Benjamin Franklin, President of the
Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania. This warrant is
recorded in book C, Volume 209, page 133 in the Department of
Community Affairs for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. When
the land was re-surveyed on 14 June, 1814 it was found to
actually contain 277 acres, nearly double the land he had held
in New Jersey. Since his lease with John Emley still had three
years to run before it would expire, Ferdinand and Christopher,
Jr. remained in New Jersey as did Martin part of the time.
After the Indian raids Christopher, Sr., with his wife
Cathrina, and their son, Andrew moved across the Blue Mountains
to Pinegrove, Pennsylvania some 75 miles west of Phillipsburg,
New Jersey. Part of this land is still occupied by the Schrope
descendants today. (1990). Christopher Shrope, Sr. died on 27
July, 1806 at the age of 79 and is buried in St. Jacobs
Lutheran Churchyard at Pinegrove, Pennsylvania. The name is
given as Stoffel in some of the family records. Stoffel is
German for Christopher. A LITTLE PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY, by Irene
Shrope and Peter Shrope The first settlers were Dutch
(Netherlands) who came up the Delaware Bay, and settled on the
shores of the Delaware River in 1623, and held control for
fifteen years until 1638. The Dutch occupied this land through
rights acquired in Pennsylvania and New York by the discoveries
of Henry Hudson, an Englishman in the employ of the Dutch East
India Company. New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware
together comprised the New Netherlands. Then came the Swedes
who wrested control from the Dutch and held the territory along
the Delaware River until 1655. They were always at war with the
Dutch, and in 1655 the Dutch reconquered the Swedes, regaining
control of the land for another nine years until 1664. This
time they lost control to the English under Duke of York who
held it until the arrival of the ship 'Welcome' with William
Penn and the Quakers in 1682. The first German Pietists
settled in Germantown, Lancaster, Bethlehem and Nazareth in
1663. Some years later, poorer people of the German Reformed
and Lutheran groups immigrated from the Rhine valley. They were
too poor to pay for their passage, so they agreed to work for
from 4 to 7 years in the New World in voluntary servitude to
pay off depts of passage. After this they were given 50 acres
of farm land with tools to work their new property. They
settled in the fertile valleys and established rich farms which
prospered in succeeding generations. Welch Quakers came in
large numbers before 1700. German immigration came with the
Mennonite, Francis D. Pastorius, who came with some Dutch
Quakers in 1683, founding Germantown, now a part of
Philadelphia. The 'Pennsylvania Dutch', as they came to be
known, settled in the counties of Northampton, Berks and
Lancaster. These people are German, not Hollanders. From the
beginning, the Germans in America existed as a people apart.
They spoke a different language, which did not popularize them
with the English and Scotch-Irish people of the New World.
Also, their steadfast adherence to the religions and customs of
the old world caused further estrangement in their relations
with the English speaking peoples. Moreover, they showed little
interest in the social or political affairs of the colony and
concentrated their energies almost wholly on the development of
the finest farming regions of America. The high mark of the
German immigration to America came around 1749 to 1754. At that
time 5,000 Germans arrived in this country each year. For the
most part they maintained the same lifestyle as at home.
Energetically, and industriously they cultivated their farms,
advanced their domestic arts, and pursued their religious
beliefs in peace and prosperity. [shrope.ftw] Here we see the
first spelling change of the name from Schropp to various other
forms, including the current, Shrope. Probably due to phonetic
variations from English speaking clerks. Johann Christopher
Schrčopp, Sr. was born on 18 February, 1727 in the village of
Oberčowisheim, Germany in the state of Baden where his father,
Hans Jerg Schrčopp, Sr. (1685) and his father before him,
Andreas had lived. All three generations of this family had
attended the Lutheran Church where on 18 June, 1749 Johann
Christopher Schrčopp married Catharina Henrica Scheib-lein. The
records of his birth and marriage can be found in the Parish
Register of the old Lutheran Church in Oberčowisheim. (Now on
micro-film) Christopher was 22 years old when he married. In
late summer of 1751 Christopher and his bride boarded the ship
'Neptune'. John Mason from Rotterdam was the Commander. They
were on their way to a new life in America! Their final
European stop was at Cowes, England on the Isle of Wight. The
ship arrived at the port of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on
Tuesday, 24 September, 1751. All passengers were taken to the
court house to take their oath of allegiance and the usual
qualifications and subscribe them. Their certificates were
signed by William Peters, Esq.. He signed his name 'Christoph
Shropp' to the immigration documents. The record of his arrival
is noted in two books, 'Pennsylvania German Pioneers' by Ralph
Beaver Strass-burger and W. J. Hinke, in Volume I, page 469 and
in 'A Collection of Upwards of 30,000 Names of Immigrants in
Pennsylvania from 1727 to 1776' by Israel Daniel Rupp, on page
262. There were 284 passengers on the ship 'Neptune'. Women and
children were not included on the passenger list. Johann
Martin Schrob was born on 02 July, 1753 in Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania and was baptized at St. Michael's Evangelical
Lutheran Church on Fifth Street and Appletree Alley on 08 July,
1753 by Pastor Henry Melchoir Muhlenburg. Sponsors were John
Martin Obersteg and Anna Cathrina. The congregation of St.
Michael's Evangelical Lutheran Church was the largest of the
numerous churches in the city. It was also the poorest because
a large portion of the members were indentured servants. Very
few of it's members settled as permanent residents of the city;
as soon as they had completed their terms of indenture they
usually would move on to seek secure property for themselves.
Between 1754 and 1758 Christopher and his little family moved
to Greenwich township in Phillipsburg, then Sussex County, New
Jersey. Here Pastor Daniel Schumacher baptized the four day old
son, Andreas on 19 November, 1758. There can be no doubt that
this is the same family for Schumacher wrote the names of the
parents as Johann Christopher Schrob and Henrica. This record
can be found in the publication of the Pennsylvania German
Society (1968) Volume I, page 249. Christopher, Jr. was born in
Phillipsburg on 02 November, 1761. The next record found for
Christopher, Sr. is on the list of com-municants for St. James
Lutheran 'Straw' Church in Greenwich township Phillipsburg on
18 May, 1776. The thatched roof on the log edifice earned it
the nickname of 'Straw' church. Early in it's history it had
been affiliated with St. Michael's of Philadelphia and it's
first pastor, from 1769 to 1773, was Peter Muhlenburg, son of
Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg. In the book 'Revolutionary War
Soldier of New Jersey' by Kenn Stryker- Rodda, Christopher,
Sr., Ferdinand, Christopher, Jr. and Martin are all listed as
'rateable' from Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Andrew Shrope is
listed in the same company as his brother Christopher, Jr. in
the book 'New Jerse
Event: Place: German Luthern
Note: Type: Ethnicity/
Event: Date: 24 SEP 1751
Place: Arrived in Philadelphia aboard 'Neptune'
Death: 27 JUL 1806 Pine Grove, Pennsylvania
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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Schibel, Catherina Henrica (b. , d. ?)
Death: --Not Shown--
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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Schropp, Johann Georg (b. 19 AUG 1685, d. ?)
Note: Apparently Johann Georg ( sometimes written: Hans Jerg) Schrčopp
married a girl with the same name as his sister. A careful
examination of the records of the period for Oberčowisheim
reveals that Maria Magdalena was a very popular name at that
time. Records for this family are located in the Parish
Register of the old Lutheran Church in Oberčowisheim, Germany.
(Baden) Records for this family are located in the Parish
Register in the old Lutheran Church in Oberčowisheim, Germany.
Anna Margaretha Schrčopp married John Adam Blyler in Providence,
Pennsylvania on 28 March, 1758. She was a daughter of Jerg
Schrčopp. Providence Square is north-west of Philadelphia.
Maria Magdalena Kebler had a brother, Hans Bernard Kebler who
was born on 11 June, 1682 at Oberčowisheim, Germany. He married
Anna Elizabeth Boserot on 16 April, 1709. As indicated by the
'T' in the ident code, Anna Margaretha and Hans Jerg, Jr. born
20 October, 1730 were twins.
First Communion: Place: Parish Records of Oberowisheim, Baden Germany
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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KeBler, Maria Magdelena (b. , d. 08 AUG 1751)
Death: 08 AUG 1751
Change: Date: 16 JUN 2005

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Schropp, Andreas (b. , d. ?)
Note: SCHROPP, SCHROPE, SHROPE, SROPE FAMILIES by: Irene Leona Shrope
Copyright 1996, Peter Shrope (pssr@charm.net) This document
may be reproduced for personal purposes only Herein is the
complete, unedited work of Irene Shrope. It spans some 1,500
pages and has no searchable index Microfiche copies have been
produced and should be available at the following locations:
¨Hunterdon County Historical Society, Flemington, New Jersey
¨National Archives, Washington, D.C. ¨Pennsylvania Archives,
Harrisburg, PA. ¨LDS Church, Salt Lake City. Table of Contents
CHAPTER I. . .The European and Pennsylvania Families Andreas
(ca 1660) . . . . . . . . . 3 Johann Christoph, Sr. (1727) . .
. 7 Andrew, Sr. (1758) . . . . . . . . 23 John, Sr. (1784) . .
. . . . . . . 35 Andrew (1807) . . . . . . . . . . .37 John
(1814) CHAPTER II . . . The New Jersey Families Christopher,
Jr. (176l) John A. (1785) David Penwell (1787) Joseph Penwell
(1797) Isaac R. (1802) John (1772) CHAPTER III . . .The Iowa
and Kansas Families Christopher (1793) Levi (1819) CHAPTER IV .
. . The Ohio Families Samuel (1805) CHAPTER V . . .The North
Carolina Families 'The Moravians' Matthew (1722) ANDREAS
SCHRčOPP And His Descendants CA 1660 to 1990 Irene Leona Shrope
This book is dedicated to all individuals who are advanced
enough to take a backward look, for the further back we look
the further ahead we can see. QUALIFICATIONS OF A GENEALOGIST
Must have an innate pride in family and country Be able to
recognize his duty to search out and record the truth. He
becomes, first of all, a full-time detective, a thorough
historian, an inveterate snoop, and at the same time, a
confirmed diplomat, a keen observer, a hardened skeptic an apt
biographer, a qualified linguist, a part-time lawyer combined
with quite a lot of district attorney, a studious sociologist
and above all -- an accurate reporter. 'One usually spends too
many years looking forward before we realize the benefits of
looking backward. If we know what we have been we can better
understand what we are'. Irene Leona Shrope Oberčowisheim is
located about 30 miles south and slightly east of Heidelberg.
It is on highway 293 between Bruchsal and Heilbronn, and about
30 miles north-east of Karlsruhe the county seat of Baden. It
is also about 30 miles east of the Rhein river. It is still a
very small village and is not shown on all maps.
Occupation: Cooper
Death: --Not Shown--
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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Heckner, Ursula Barbara (b. , d. ?)
Change: Date: 13 APR 2002

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